Efimia Karakantza

Efimia Karakantza

Efimia D. Karakantza is Tenured Assistant Professor of Ancient Greek Literature at the University of Patras, Greece, where she has taught since 2007. Her degrees are from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (BA in Classics 1986) and Reading University (PhD in Classics 1993). She is a Fellow in Ancient Greek Literature of the Center for Hellenic Studies, University of Harvard, for which she directs the Kyklos project.
Most of her publications have been on Homer, Attic drama and approaches to Greek myths. In her book on Ancient Greek myths. The 20th century discourse on their nature and interpretation (Athens 2004, in Greek), she studied five major approaches to traditional narratives (among which psychoanalysis, the French School, and Semiotics). In 2014 she introduced a new course on the Reception of Ancient Greek Drama at the department of Philology (Classics division) at the University of Patras. She is the Director of the Jocasta Classical Reception Greece project (http://jocasta.upatras.gr).
She is interested in contemporary Greek cinema and theatrical performances that explore (directly or indirectly) aspects of the Classical tradition aiming at reconstructing a discourse that renegotiates issues of ethnic and political identity, gender, and ultimately the (new) notion of humanity. She is currently working on a book on Sophocles titled: ‘Who Am I?’ (Mis)Identity of the Polis in Oedipus Tyrannus (expected date of publication in fall 2017).

Who is the Outsider in the “Arrival of the Outsider”? Greek Tragedy and the Xenos. 

This theoretical workshop will present the general outline of the thesis that Greek tragedy is centered on the arrival of the outsider. However, who is this outsider? A foreigner (a non-Greek), or a refugee of war or civil conflict? Could he / she be a woman, a rebel, an intransigent hero, in short, a non-canonical person in the Greek polis? Under which circumstances a person in the polis can be characterized as ‘non-canonical’, that is not complying with the laws of the community? Specific dramatic cases, such as Antigone, Oedipus the King, Medea, and The Trojan Women will be examined.