Ioannis Petropoulos

Ioannis Petropoulos

Ioannis Petropoulos is Professor of Ancient Greek Literature in the Department of Greek Philology, Democritean University of Thrace, and Director of the Center for Hellenic Studies-Greece, Harvard University (CHS-GR).
He studied classics at Harvard (B.A.) and Oxford (DPhil.). He has given papers and taught as Visiting Professor at universities in Europe, China, Brazil, and the US (Oxford, the Sorbonne, Harvard, Stanford, University of California-Santa Cruz, Vanderbilt, Universidade de Sãο Paulo, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais,Universidade Federal do Ceará, Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro, etc.).
In 2011 his book, Kleos in a minor key: The Homeric education of a Little Prince, was published by CHS and Harvard University Press (also available online via the Center for Hellenic Studies-Publications). Since 2013 he has been researching monsters and ‘paradoxa’ in ancient Greek fantasy, and the reception of ancient Greek literature in Brazil from 1500 to 1800.

Waiting for the Other

What is the Other (male and female)? If we accept the already established interpretation, it is "not myself, he/she or that which is different from me". One of the broad categories of the Other in ancient Greek thought was the Barbarian. In this speech Ioannis Petropoulos will refer to the Barbarians in the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. and examine them in contrast to the barbarians of Konstantinos Cavafy in the poem "Waiting for the Barbarians.”Using this poem as a starting point, he will address the general issue of the dialogue with the Other or the Outsider, the dialectical relationship between two different poles. Why are the Others inevitable in a society? Could they be vitally necessary?