Plutus 2018-06-22T14:44:06+00:00

National Theatre of Greece - Nikita Milivojević

Plutus
by Aristophanes

Written in 388 B.C., during the Corynthian War, Aristophanes’ last surviving comedy marks a transition from the Attic Old Comedy to the New Comedy, as evidenced by the reduced role of the chorus, the limited political commentary, the subject matter (polis and the citizens), the happier undertones without too much obscene language, and, overall, a more explicitly moralistic tone. The main hero is Chremylos, a bankrupt farmer who is at a loss to understand why he lost his fortune, despite being honest and pious. Chremylos and his slave, Carion, nurse Plutus to health. Blinded by Zeus, Plutus is unable to distinguish between the just and the unjust, the honourable and the dishonourable. When Plutus finally regains his sight, justice is accordingly restored. Aristophanes’ comedy is a wink to the audience, indicating what he would consider fair in an ideal polis: everyone getting their just deserts.

With English surtitles